Lot 179 - 1966 Jaguar E-Type Series I Fixedhead Coupé (4.2 litre)

Lot 179 - 1966 Jaguar E-Type Series I Fixedhead Coupé (4.2 litre)

Lot 179 - 1966 Jaguar E-Type Series I Fixedhead Coupé (4.2 litre)

Lot Number 179
Registration DWL 110D
Chassis Number 1E21179
Engine Number 7E7621-9
Odometer reading 6,826 miles
Estimate £48,000 - £58,000
  • UK supplied, manual car
  • Older restoration by Lynx Cars Ltd
  • Matching numbers

Famously launched at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, the Jaguar E-Type created a furore. Its combination of supercar performance, superb styling and a low price tag left rivals reeling and customers clamouring. Built as a monocoque with a front sub-frame to cradle the engine, the model's combination of all-round independent suspension (torsion-bar front/coil-sprung rear) rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes gave it excellent road holding and handling capabilities. Fed by triple SU HD8 carburettors and topped with a 'straight port' DOHC cylinder head, its indomitable 3781cc straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 265bhp and 260lbft of torque. Allied to a four-speed Moss gearbox, it reputedly enabled the low-slung two-seater to sprint from 0-60mph in 6.9 seconds and onto 150mph. While any E-Type roadster is desirable, the lithesome free-revving 3.8 litre cars enjoy a particularly exalted status; however, the later Series I, 4.2 litre was a better engine.

The supplied BMI Heritage certificate shows DWL 110D to have been completed on 12th January 1966 and dispatched to its distributor, Henlys Ltd of London on 24th January 1966. A home market, manual car that comes with a lovely history file chronicling its ownership and work carried out through most of its life. Amongst the correspondence is communications from Lynx Cars Ltd, the well respected Jaguar specialists, who were commissioned to restore the car to ‘A1’ standard in 1990. As part of their restoration, they included a photographic record of the car’s restoration. Rather charmingly there are also many other correspondence between some earlier specialists communicating the progress of various works carried out on the car. The vendor, who has owned the car for the past ten years, has always garaged and maintained the car, having any work it has needed carried out immediately. The car has just had a major service, which included having the carburettors stripped and rebuilt, with the vendor reporting the car to run and drive very well. Indeed, when inspecting the car, the consigner was taken for a drive in it and was impressed by how well it ran. The interior presents very well and matches the mechanical condition of the car. There is some evidence of micro blistering in the car’s paint, as well as the odd mark that is to be expected from an older restoration, but the car appears to be very solid, both structurally and mechanically.

Supplied with a UK V5C registration document, BMI Heritage Certificate, MoT test certificates dating back to the early 1980’s, (as well its current MoT being valid through until May 2023), toolkit and file of receipts and history of the car’s life. The 4.2 coupé is a rare car these days, especially as a home market car in manual and is generally considered the best driving of all the E-Types.

 

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Accordingly, buyers are on notice that each vehicle is offered ‘as is/as seen’ subject to the Terms and Conditions for the auction. Buyers are advised to inspect the vehicle in person or use a professional to carry out this service. Historics will not entertain disputes over descriptions.

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