Lot 111 - 1966 Triumph Spitfire 4 Mk II

Lot 111 - 1966 Triumph Spitfire 4 Mk II

Lot 111 - 1966 Triumph Spitfire 4 Mk II

Lot Number 111
Registration FDV 427D
Chassis Number FC69065
Engine Number FC70320HE
Odometer reading 53,226 miles
Estimate £18,000 - £20,000
Result Sold - £17,920

The 1962 Earls Court Motor Show saw the introduction of the Triumph Spitfire 4, a small lightweight sports car designed by Michelotti and a design that had much in common with its sibling, the Triumph Herald. The 4 within the title referred to the four cylinder engine with thoughts to the future of producing a six cylinder version. In UK specification, the in-line four produced 63bhp at 5750rpm which gave a top speed of 92mph and would achieve 0 to 60mph in 16.4 seconds. Average fuel consumption was 31mpg. In March 1965, the Spitfire 4 Mk. II was introduced. It was very similar to the Mk. I; in addition to small trim changes, a revised camshaft and exhaust design gave the Mk. II a modest 4bhp increase in power. With a fully opening front end, servicing was a delight and today, these British sports cars are well catered for by several specialists throughout the UK. This pretty little car outsold its Abingdon rivals during every year of production except one and that was the year the Canley factory went on strike. Production finally ceased in the summer of 1980 ending an 18-year production run; quite something for this small sports car.

We are delighted to offer this lovely 1966 Triumph Spitfire 4 Mk. II presented in Signal Red and black trim. This Spitfire has, in recent years, undergone restoration works to the coachwork and mechanical items including an engine overhaul. Chrome wire wheels add to the charm and the easily removed hardtop allows the warmer months to be enjoyed to the full; however, in case of summer showers, an excellent soft top is included and is easily erected.  On inspection, the Spitfire presents very well indeed and of particular note are the panel gaps and the way the doors shut with a reassuring clunk, a tribute to the quality of restoration. On settling into the driver's seat everything falls easily to hand. A short test revealed that the car started easily and drove well whilst stopping with confidence. The early Spitfires, with their pretty bonnets and low bumpers, have long been overlooked but now enthusiasts are recognising their potential. With a realistic estimate, we feel that these small British sports cars are surely not going to stay at their current market level for long.

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Buyers are advised to inspect the car in person or use a professional to carry out this service.

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