Lot 236 - 1936 Vauxhall 14/6 Tickford

Lot 236 - 1936 Vauxhall 14/6 Tickford

Lot 236 - 1936 Vauxhall 14/6 Tickford

Lot Number 236
Registration 711UXG
Chassis Number 652785
Engine Number 457884
Odometer reading 11,800 miles
Estimate £24,000 - £28,000

Alexander Wilson founded the company (Vauxhall) in Dusian Road, Vauxhall, London in 1857. Originally named Alex Wilson and Company before changing to Vauxhall Iron Works, it originally built pumps and marine engines. In 1903, the company built its first car, due to high demand the company needed to expand and moved the majority of its production to Luton in 1905. The company continued to trade under the name Vauxhall Iron Works until 1907 when the more modern name of Vauxhall Motors was adopted. Much of Vauxhall's success during the early years of Vauxhall Motors was due to Laurence Pomeroy who joined Vauxhall in 1906 as an assistant draughtsman and was asked by the Managing Director, Percy Kidner, to design an engine for cars to be entered in the 1908 RAC and Scottish Reliability Trial held in June of that year. The cars were so successful that Pomeroy took over the roll as chief designer. Two cars were entered in the 1910 Prince Henry Trials and although not outright winners, performed well and replicas were made for sale officially as the C-type, but known as the Prince Henry. During the First World War, Vauxhall made large numbers of the D-type, comprising of a Prince Henry chassis with de-rated engine, for use as staff cars for the British forces. In spite of making good cars, expensive pedigree cars of the kind that had served the company well in the prosperous pre-war years were no longer in demand; the company struggled to make a consistent profit and in 1925, Vauxhall were acquired by General Motors for US.$2.5 million. The company's future chief engineer, Harold Drew, left Luton for a spell working as a draughtsman with GM's Lansing-based Oldsmobile division. As the first significant post-acquisition passenger car, the Cadet, is generally regarded as demonstrating Vauxhall's newly acquired interest and expertise in controlling production costs, but it was also noteworthy as the first British car to feature a synchromesh gearbox. During World War II, car production at Luton was suspended to allow Vauxhall to work on the new Churchill tank, taking it from the drawing board to production in less than a year.

This delightful 14/6 was first registered in November 1936 to a lady doctor and has been in the custody of the current vendor for the last 35 years, he is only the second owner. The styling is of a four door saloon with a Tickford conversion and is believed to be the only one of its kind in existence today. The vendor has, in his possession, the original guarantee from Vauxhall together with a letter from Tickford in respect of the conversion. The fastidious vendor has, during his ownership, had all the brightwork re-chromed and rebuilt the engine together with fitting a new clutch some 15 years ago. We are informed that the vehicle has covered approximately 2,000 miles since. In addition to this, a new hood has been fitted and more recently a new set of tyres together with a new exhaust system. The two-tone paintwork on the car is in very good order and the leather interior completely original and split free; which taking into account the car 76 years old, is remarkable.  Supplied with a V5 document and an MoT test certificate valid until June 2012, this is an opportunity to purchase a rare, but entirely useable pre-war classic.

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Buyers are advised to inspect the car in person or use a professional to carry out this service.

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