Lot 366 - 1970 MG Midget Mk. III

Lot 366 - 1970 MG Midget Mk. III

Lot 366 - 1970 MG Midget Mk. III

Lot Number 366
Registration CLN 432H
Chassis Number GAN580178
Engine Number 8836
Odometer reading 844 miles
Estimate No Reserve
Result Sold - £2,240

Back in the 1920's, the M-Type Midget had been developed from the baby Morris Minor. The result was a basic, cheap, fun two-seater, with sporting pretensions which triggered a whole dynasty of Midgets. It was the Midget series which had established MG as a manufacturer of sports cars with an excellent reputation in motor sport. In the late 1950's, yet another basic, cheap, fun two-seater was developed from a 'baby' car. This time, the more modern equivalent of the old Austin Seven was used, the A30/35. This new two-seater car was the Austin-Healey Sprite, which appeared in 1959 and was built at Abingdon.In 1961, the bodywork of the Sprite came in for a major restyling. The central cockpit portion remained essentially the same, but the front and rear bodywork was completely restyled to give the car a more conventional squared-off appearance. The engine and running gear was essentially the same as the earlier Sprite, but output was up to around 47bhp, which led to increases in performance also. In this form, the car was known as the Austin-Healey Sprite Mark II, but shortly after, a De Luxe version was announced. It had been re-badged to become known as the MG Midget. The new Midget was to find a ready and enthusiastic market among the dedicated MG fans, as it was a sports car with all the traditional MG characteristics - small, inexpensive, fast, and safe with predictable handling. Above all, it was a fun car.

With various upgrades throughout its production, we eventually arrive at the Mk. III. Whilst the Mk. II continued to sell until late 1966, the engine was now enlarged with a 1275cc A-series unit developed from the one used in the Mini Cooper S. This produced 65bhp and could propel the little car to speeds in the mid 90's. Although there were no really obvious changes to the appearance of the car, there were minor ones. Perhaps one of the most important of these was the addition of a folding soft top, which replaced the one which had to be fully removed to be stowed.

Loved for nearly 30 years by the vendor, this model it has seen the courting of his wife, their marriage, holidays to France and Scotland and children. Very much part of the family, this well looked after example has been maintained by specialist Alan Collins of Malden, a firm well respected within historic motoring circles, and the bills and invoices found in the history file details a full engine rebuild in 2010 as well as a brake overhaul, new clutch and exhaust. Supplied with an MoT test certificate valid until May, 2012, a UK V5C registration certificate, history file and the knowledge that this has been well maintained over the years, this extremely engaging sports car is offered without reserve.

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Accordingly, buyers are on notice that each vehicle is offered ‘as is/as seen’ subject to the Terms and Conditions for the auction. Buyers are advised to inspect the vehicle in person or use a professional to carry out this service. Historics will not entertain disputes over descriptions.

Web design London Edgebound