Lot 368 - 1956 Lagonda 3L Open Tourer by Tickford

Lot 368 - 1956 Lagonda 3L Open Tourer by Tickford

Lot 368 - 1956 Lagonda 3L Open Tourer by Tickford

Lot Number 368
Registration 251 UXK
Chassis Number SABTVR03295180003
Engine Number VB6H/726
Odometer reading 70,774 miles
Estimate £38,000 - £45,000

Founded in 1899 at Staines, Middlesex, by Wilbur Gunn, an expatriate American, the company diversified from its original steam engines into the new motor cycles in 1900, followed by three-wheeled tricars in 1904. These lasted until 1907 when their market suddenly collapsed. Gunn then converted his products to four wheels, which grew steadily larger, culminating in a 4.5 litre 6, and started an export business to Russia, triggered by a notable success in the 1910 St. Petersburg to Moscow rally. A rapidly expanding series of technologically advanced motorcars then ensued over the following 40 years with notable success in trans-continental rallies and Le Mans. The Second World War affected production as with almost all other marques. Once it became clear that the Allies were likely to win, W.O. set about designing a post-war car.  A gloomy market prediction led him to rule out re-introducing the V12 and led him to design a smaller (2.6 litre) six cylinder car, for which a brand new twin overhead cam engine and an all-independently sprung chassis were proposed.  By VE Day three hand-made prototypes had been built and were being tested.  But the 1945 government had little sympathy for expensive cars and issued a completely useless steel allocation.  So Lagonda, well financed for the first time in its life, couldn't build any cars.  Good severed his interest and the company was sold to David Brown, already the owner of Aston Martin and keen to buy W.O's brilliant engine to put in them. By the end of 1952 the 2.6 was beginning to look a bit outdated, so a revised body design, originally drawn up by Tickford and fitted to a few bespoke 2.6s, was made into the DB 3L, which used a revised version of the Bentley engine, bored out to give three litres by using asymmetric connecting rods.  The two-door saloon was soon joined by a four-door and a drophead coupé.  Production of the 3 litre finally ended at the end of 1957, by which time all Aston Martin Lagonda production had moved to the old Tickford plant at Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire.

Delivered on the 15th November, 1956 to the Newcastle Chronicle & Journal and registered on the following Saturday with the registration mark, DGB1 until just 1959 when it was changed to 126EBB. This remained until 1967 when the service records end. The current age-related plate and chassis number was attributed to this car in 2005 following a comprehensive restoration. The chassis itself was originally marked LB290/1/213 and together with its upgraded non-original engine was used in the restoration. The bodywork started life on another car as a saloon and was then adjusted to show the current convertible lines shown here.  The integrity of the adaptation is good with excellent choice of materials as can be illustrated by its successes in classic car shows around the country, most notably, Car of the Show at Tatton Park in both 2006 and 2007. There is also an interesting history file accompanying this car not only showing that in 1959, it became the property of the recently defunct, News of The World, but also detailing extensive invoices and ownership details. Fully serviced and 'MoT'd' by specialist automotive engineers, Oselli Classic and Sportscars in Oxfordshire, this extremely elegant motorcar provides ample room for four people to travel in comfort and with one of Britain's oldest badges on the bonnet, Lagonda.

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Accordingly, buyers are on notice that each vehicle is offered ‘as is/as seen’ subject to the Terms and Conditions for the auction. Buyers are advised to inspect the vehicle in person or use a professional to carry out this service. Historics will not entertain disputes over descriptions.

Web design London Edgebound