Lot 350 - 1963 Jaguar Mk. II Saloon - Restoration Project

Lot 350 - 1963 Jaguar Mk. II Saloon - Restoration Project

Lot 350 - 1963 Jaguar Mk. II Saloon - Restoration Project

Lot Number 350
Registration DMY 30A
Chassis Number 163352DN
Engine Number KH-9725-8
Odometer reading 1,918 miles
Estimate No Reserve
Result Sold - £2,128

The lineage of the Mk. II can be directly traced back to its predecessor, the 2.4 saloon, or Mk. I as it would be retrospectively known in later years. This sporting saloon, designed to fill the gap in Jaguar's range between the XK sports and voluminous Mk. VII, entered the market in 1956. Power came from the legendary XK straight six, twin cam, engine in 2483cc form. The 2.4 was notable as being a complete break away from the previous designs of (Sir) William Lyons and Co., and was their first foray into the modern world of monocoque construction. Traditional Jaguar buyers would not feel alienated by the new offering from Coventry however, as the interior was up to their usual standards, with leather and walnut being the order of the day. With 112bhp available to the press-on motorist, the 2.4 was not overly burdened with pace, so Jaguar's response was to come in the shape of a 3.4 litre version, which was launched in 1957 to supplement its smaller brother in their mid-size saloon range.  As a result, 120mph was a genuinely achievable pace, necessitating the introduction of disc brakes a year later to keep speeds in check. Rather than introduce a completely brand new car, Jaguar successfully re-designed the car from stem to stern, and the Mk2 was born, debuting in 1959. The chunky windscreen pillars of the early car were replaced by slimmer offerings giving a much more airy cabin, which both improved the styling and freshened up the design for the new decade.

Little is known about this Mk. II's early life except that it spent some of its time down in the West Country. It was then acquired, it is thought, by the last owner in 1989, fully working, and passed to Jaguar specialist, Alan Collins, who stripped the car back to its constituent parts and began the painstaking process of restoration. The engine and gearbox were taken out and rebuilt whilst the body was sent to a local body shop in Essex. It was here that it was taken back to bare metal and repaired where required. It was then etch-primed and primed in grey ready for finishing. Work then stopped and the car was re-united with its drive train and it is in this condition that it is offered for sale. All parts accompany this project although it will require a re-trim and paint prior to completion. Offered at no reserve, this could easily be a solid basis for an uncomplicated restoration or even as a donor car for a D-Type/C-Type replica.

Interested parties should satisfy themselves as to the description and condition of each lot prior to the sale. Accordingly, buyers are on notice that each vehicle is offered ‘as is/as seen’ subject to the Terms and Conditions for the auction. Buyers are advised to inspect the vehicle in person or use a professional to carry out this service. Historics will not entertain disputes over descriptions.

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