Other vehicles in our March 9, 2013 auction

 


Teardrop Caravan – ‘Airstream Baby’

Alvis
TA21 Saloon

Jaguar
XJ6 3.2L Executive

Mercedes-Benz
300SL

Volkswagen
Scirocco Mk.II ‘Storm’

Rolls-Royce
Corniche Fixedhead Coupé

Jaguar
XJS V12

Mercedes-Benz
320CE Cabriolet

Citroen
H Van

Warwick
GT

Triumph
TR6

Austin-Healey
BN1 (upgraded to M-Specification)

Mercedes-Benz
190E

Hillman
Husky Series 1

MG
YT

Porsche
911 3.2 litre Carrera Cabriolet

Austin
Maxi ‘1970 World Cup London to Mexico City Rally Car’

Ferrari
308/360 Dino

Rolls-Royce
Silver Spur

Jaguar
XK150 Fixedhead Coupé

Jensen
Interceptor Convertible

Bentley
Continental R

Ford
Zephyr Mk II

Porsche
911 RSR 3.0L Recreation

Lea Francis
14hp Sports

Morris
London Taxi

Jaguar
XK150 Roadster

Rolls-Royce
Silver Cloud III Fixedhead Coupé by Mulliner/Park Ward

Aston Martin
1½ litre Mk. ll Long Chassis Open Tourer

Alvis
TE21 Drophead Coupé

Allard
K1 Roadster

Porsche
911/964 Carrera 2 Coupe

Jaguar
XK120 Roadster

MG
A Roadster

Sunbeam
Alpine Series V

Austin
Mini Mk.I Super Deluxe

Rolls-Royce
Silver Cloud III

Alfa Romeo
2600 Spyder

Mercedes-Benz
280SL Roadster

Bentley
Continental Convertible Mk. IV

Mercedes-Benz
ML 420 CDi

Ferrari
Testarossa

Jaguar
XJ220

Porsche
911SC to RS Specification

Austin-Healey
3000 Mk. II BT7

Bentley
Corniche Fixedhead Coupé

Jaguar
E-Type SIII Roadster

Austin-Healey
100/4 BN2 Up-rated to 100M Specification

Daimler
V8 250 Saloon

Sunbeam
Harrington Le Mans

Alfa Romeo
2600 Sprint

De Tomaso
Longchamp GTSE

Ferrari
Dino 308 GT4

Mercedes-Benz
300SL

Volkswagen
T2 Westfalia Campervan

Rolls-Royce
Silver Shadow II

Range Rover
CSK

Volkswagen
Beetle 1300

Austin
Seven RM

Ferrari
348TB

Fiat
124 Spider

Ford
Lotus Cortina Mk. 1

Alfa Romeo
Duetto Spider by Pininfarina

BSA
10 H.P. Peerless Coupé

Caterham
7 Superlight

Daimler
DB18 Barker Special

Mercedes-Benz
230 SL

Porsche
911SC to RS Specification

Rolls-Royce
20hp Open Tourer by Barker

MG
TB

Porsche
911 Carerra RS

Triumph
TR3

Jaguar
SS 1½ litre Saloon

Jaguar
Mk. II Saloon

Ford
Thunderbird Convertible

Ford
Mustang 289GT Coupé

Pontiac
Torpedo Deluxe

Lincoln
Town Car ‘Signature Series’

Ford
Galaxie 500 Coupé

Pierce Arrow
Model B

Buick
60 Series Four Door Sedan

Hudson
Essex Super Six Doctors Coupé

Ford
Mustang 289 Fastback

Hudson
Super Eight

Commer
Q4 Dropside Lorry

Dodge
Tanker Truck

Stanley
20hp Mountain Wagon


Gardner-Serpollet 15hp Model Four Seater Type F1 (Steam Car)

Vermorel
12/16 Model L Torpedo Tourer

Lotus
Elan S4

Ford
Capri Mk. III 1.6 GL *WITHDRAWN*

Rolls-Royce
Corniche Convertible

Mercedes-Benz
190 ‘Fintail’

NSU
Ro 80

Lotus
Elan S3 Convertible

Mercedes-Benz
250CE

Rolls-Royce
Silver Shadow I

Bentley
T1

Ford
Capri Mk.I

Sunbeam
Tiger

Bentley
Turbo R by James Young

Jaguar
XJSC ‘Guy Salmon Jubilee Edition’

Bentley
R-Type Standard Steel Saloon

Mercedes-Benz
450SL

Bentley
Mulsanne S

Rolls-Royce
Corniche Convertible

Mercedes-Benz
E220 Cabriolet

Mercedes-Benz
S600 Limousine

Rolls-Royce
Silver Shadow II

NSU
Prinz 4L

Mercedes-Benz
SL320

Porsche
911 Targa

Vauxhall
Astra Twin Top Convertible *UNDER OFFER*

Austin
Seven Ruby

Land Rover
Series II

Alfa Romeo
Spider Series IV

Mercedes-Benz
380SL Roadster

TVR
Tasmin 200, Series II

Volvo
N88 (4x2 tractor unit) *WITHDRAWN*
 
 
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226 - 1929 Morris London Taxi

 
 
 
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Registration UL8563
Chassis Number 060G
Engine Number 14909G
Estimate £25,000 - £30,000

This is the only known survivor of a total production run of 840 cabs. 

Back in 1926 Morris decided he would offer an export model car to boost overseas sales.  The Morris Oxford was scaled up until it fitted a modified 13cwt lorry chassis and running gear.  1,700 cars were built and offered for sale around the world as the Empire Oxford.  In retrospect it was an excellent vehicle, comparable to anything made in America. 

However, due to poor sales, many were dismantled and shipped back to the United Kingdom to be rebuilt as Taxicabs. Most of the Empire parts remained unchanged and were incorporated into the new cabs such as the 15.9hp engine (2513cc), the four-speed gearbox and the overhead worm drive rear axle.  Headlights were not normally fitted to the new cabs as it was not normal to operate beyond the street lamp area for city cabs.  Likewise speedometers were not fitted because taxicabs could not go faster than the rest of the traffic which was, of course, obeying the speed limits!

Although the passengers were well catered for, very little comfort was afforded to the driver with only a small gutter above his head to keep the rain off.  It is believed that a small tin box was fitted on top of the exhaust manifold to dry the driver's spare pair of gloves but was also excellent for warming pies.

This super-rare example was first discovered in a barn by a friend of the current owner.  It came out of service in 1939 and was bought at auction by a farmer who converted it into a cheap tractor where it served long and hard throughout the war. Eventually the farmer decided to sell it and as it was loaded onto the lorry, the vendor attempted to take the stones and scrap iron out of the back of the vehicle and was told that they were added to the rear for extra weight when the taxi was used as a tractor.  He was told to take them back to Wales to dispose of as the farmer did not want them where it was discovered that the scrap iron was in fact two unexploded mortar bombs and an anti tank rocket - the farmer said that they were just blank rounds picked up in the hay rake after army manoeuvres and that they should be thrown in the trash collection.  But after the police were contacted, the bomb disposal unit confirmed that they were still live and took them away for detonation.

The very strict regulations for London cabs have led to many peculiarities of design meaning that this cab was not allowed to have an inside rear view mirror thus preventing the driver from watching the back seat. All cabs had to carry hay and water for a horse; this one has a hay box on the running board and water in the radiator.  As a recognized 'controller' of a taxi cab, the driver is allowed to relieve himself against the rear nearside wheel only, in a public place, providing he keeps one hand on the cab thus remaining in control of the cab. The Morris cab drove, cost and ran like a commercial vehicle whereas the Austin was basically a private car with a low purchase price and running costs. 

The folding rear hood section was another safety feature, which was supposed to allow easy escape from a crashed vehicle. Even the window winder handles received special attention from the Public Carriage Office; these were partly recessed into the door trim to ensure no one was injured with a slamming door. So many of the original city cabs were destroyed during the Blitz that the Public Carriage Office had to relax the 10 year rule and many licences were allowed to continue for another 10 years after they should have been withdrawn from service.

The first outing, post restoration, was the 1975 Commercial London to Brighton run and it has been in constant use ever since, competing in many rallies and appearing in most of the families' wedding albums.  Apart from the history file and its feature in Bill Munroe's 'A Century of London Taxis', there also exists a 1933 motoring magazine in which this actual cab can be seen in the background of a general London view used to advertise a completely different make of vehicle. Fully MoT'd and with plenty of life to live and fares to take, this 'one-off' opportunity is of significant importance to the history of the London Taxi.